Share:

Tuzigoot National Monument

Central Arizona, Arizona

Start Exploring
Tuzigoot National Monument

Share:

Advertisement
  • The park entrance.- Tuzigoot National Monument
  • Tuzigoot ruins as seen from the road.- Tuzigoot National Monument
  • Tuzigoot Visitor Center.- Tuzigoot National Monument
  • Tuzigoot ruins.- Tuzigoot National Monument
  • Looking south from the ruins.- Tuzigoot National Monument
  • The Verde River.- Tuzigoot National Monument
  • Stone metate for grinding corn.- Tuzigoot National Monument
  • Looking up to the top of Tuzigoot.- Tuzigoot National Monument
  • Tuzigoot ruins.- Tuzigoot National Monument
  • Tuzigoot ruins.- Tuzigoot National Monument
  • The exhibits are simple but informative.- Tuzigoot National Monument
Overview + Weather
Pros: 
Excellent museum with artifacts. Beautiful setting.
Cons: 
Open during limited daylight hours only.
Advertisement
Region:
Central Arizona, AZ
Congestion: 
High
Pets allowed: 
Yes
Parking Pass: 
National Park Pass
Preferable Season(s):
Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall
Current Local Weather:
Advertisement
Adventure Description

Adventure Description

Pro Contributor

The Southern Sinagua people started building large pueblos on hilltops and canyon alcoves in the area of present-day Cottonwood around A.D. 1150. These people lived primarily on a diet of corn supplemented with small game. They also mined and traded salt from a nearby salt mine. Their pottery was undecorated but made of highly polished brown clay, and they made stone tools and wove garments of cotton.

These people moved away by A.D. 1400, and we can only speculate on the reason. Overpopulation, climate change, conflict with other groups or even spiritual beliefs have all been suggested. Today, all we have are a few relics and the reconstructed ruins of Tuzigoot.

The pueblo consisted of around 100 rooms covering a short hill along the Verde River. It had fallen into a very bad state when the owner of the property, the copper mining company Phelps Dodge, sold the land to the U.S. government for $1. The Works Project Administration took on the project of excavating and reconstructing the ruins in 1934, and it became a national monument in 1939. The excellent exhibits in the visitor center and the picturesque ruins are very evocative and provide a great introduction to the Puebloan culture of the Southwest.

The nearby ruins of Montezuma Castle are a sister park that can be easily visited the same day.

Updates, Tips + Comments

Updates, Tips + Comments

Field Guide

Field Guide

Download
Advertisement
Location + Directions

Location + Directions

Nearby Camping + Lodging

(4 within a 30 mile radius)

Nearby Adventures

(30 within a 30 mile radius)

Advertisement
Related Content

Related Content

Adventure Community

Adventure Community

Who Wants To Do It
4 Members
Who's Done It
8 Members
Submission by
Pro Contributor
628 Adventures Explored
559 Adventures Published

Newsletter Signup

Join the Outdoor Project Community

Get access to essential planning materials and information for your next adventure. Take a few seconds to join the community. It’s FREE!

Free Field Guides + Maps

Post Updates, Tips + Comments

Organize + Track Your Adventures

Insider Detailed Info, News + Benefits

Custom Driving Directions

Recommended Campsites, Photos + Reservation Info