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Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach

Malibu

Los Angeles Metro Area, California

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Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach

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  • Surfrider Beach and Malibu Lagoon State Beach.- Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach
  • Surfrider Beach and Malibu Lagoon State Beach.- Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach
  • Surfers at Surfrider Beach, Malibu Lagoon State Beach.- Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach
  • Restroom and outdoor shower facilities at Surfrider Beach and Malibu Lagoon State Beach.- Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach
  • Adamson House (historic museum) and beach volleyball net at Malibu Lagoon State Beach.- Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach
  • Malibu Lagoon State Beach.- Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach
  • Malibu Lagoon State Beach.- Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach
  • Double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) at Malibu Lagoon State Beach.- Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach
  • Brown pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis) and western gulls (Laris occidentalis) at Malibu Lagoon State Beach.- Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach
  • Great egret (Ardea alba) at Malibu Lagoon State Beach.- Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach
  • Malibu Lagoon State Beach.- Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach
  • Malibu Lagoon State Beach.- Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach
  • Brown pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis) and western gulls (Laris occidentalis) at Malibu Lagoon State Beach.- Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach
  • Brown pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis) at Malibu Lagoon State Beach.- Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach
  • Western gull (Larus occidentalis) at Malibu Lagoon State Beach.- Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach
  • Brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) at Malibu Lagoon State Beach.- Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach
  • Unidentified species (help us identify it by providing feedback).- Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach
  • Western gull (Larus occidentalis) at Malibu Lagoon State Beach.- Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach
  • Brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) at Malibu Lagoon State Beach.- Malibu Lagoon State Beach + Surfrider Beach
Overview + Weather
Pros: 
Surfing. Bird watching. Historical museum.
Cons: 
Very crowded during summer months. Limited parking. Dogs not permitted on beach.
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Region:
Los Angeles Metro Area, CA
Congestion: 
High
Location type: 
Sandy beach
Parking Pass: 
State Park Fee
Current Local Weather:
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Adventure Description

Adventure Description

Contributor

Situated at the junction of Malibu Creek and the Pacific Ocean, this popular beach is a must-see for surfers and history buffs alike. Malibu Pier lies to the east, and a picnic area lies to the west. A large wetlands takes up part of the land and provides the opportunity to observe 200 different species of bird in their natural habitat. Hikers and bird watchers frequent the dirt pathways that wind through the wetlands. The beach also boasts beautiful gardens that are bursting with flowers.

Visitors seeking an educational experience gravitate toward the guided tours that focus on local plants and animals as well as the history of the Chumash tribe that once lived on this land. The Adamson House is always worth a visit. Docents lead informative tours and explain the significance of the historical artifacts displayed in the house. The Adamson House itself has a place on the National Register of Historic Places. Its former garage has been converted into the Malibu Lagoon Museum, another popular destination.

This land was populated by the Chumash Indians until late in the 1700s. It was eventually taken over by Frederick Hastings Rindge, a wealthy Harvard graduate who ended up possessing all of Malibu and twenty miles of California coastland. He paid only $10 per acre for the land. He went on to develop a railway line that connected Malibu to other parts of California since there were no roads that reached Malibu at the time. Rhoda Rindge, Frederick’s daughter, married Merritt Huntley Adamson in the early 1900s, and they built the Adamson House in 1929. They decked it out with molded ceilings, bottle glass windows, and doors that had been carved by hand. It wasn’t until 1893 that the house was transformed into a museum.

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(3 within a 30 mile radius)

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(61 within a 30 mile radius)

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