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Nicholas Canyon County Beach

Malibu

Los Angeles Metro Area, California

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Nicholas Canyon County Beach

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  • Day use picnic area at Nicholas Canyon County Beach.- Nicholas Canyon County Beach
  • Nicholas Canyon County Beach.- Nicholas Canyon County Beach
  • Nicholas Canyon County Beach.- Nicholas Canyon County Beach
  • Nicholas Canyon County Beach.- Nicholas Canyon County Beach
  • Brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) at Nicholas Canyon County Beach.- Nicholas Canyon County Beach
  • Nicholas Canyon County Beach.- Nicholas Canyon County Beach
  • Nicholas Canyon County Beach.- Nicholas Canyon County Beach
  • - Nicholas Canyon County Beach
Overview + Weather
Pros: 
Open sandy beach. Picnic areas.
Cons: 
Dogs, alcohol and campfires are not permitted on beach.
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Region:
Los Angeles Metro Area, CA
Congestion: 
High
Location type: 
Sandy beach
Rocky shore
Parking Pass: 
General Day Use Fee
Current Local Weather:
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Adventure Description

Adventure Description

Contributor

Nicholas Canyon County Beach sits just north of Robert Meyer Memorial Beach and a mile south of Leo Carrillo State Beach. While it definitely gets crowded, it is often less congested than its popular neighbors. Surfers enjoy this beach because of its point break, but you will also find people swimming, diving, and windsurfing in the water. The tide pools are bursting with fascinating sea creatures, the sand is ideal for sunbathing, and the scattered picnic tables provide a convenient place to eat your lunch. If you visit during the summer there will likely be a food truck parked nearby. Lifeguards are on duty in the summer as well. The beach has public restrooms and showers, and it is open during daylight hours. Unfortunately, dogs are not permitted at Nicholas Canyon County Beach.

Long before Los Angeles County owned this land, it was the home of the Chumash Native American tribe. Some archaeologists believe that the tribe was living here as long ago as 4000 BC. The Chumash hunted, fished, and gathered their food. The tribe primarily passed along their history orally, and they developed an intricate monetary system that involved beads. Children played games that helped them to develop important skills and a sense of good sportsmanship. 

The Wishtoyo Foundation maintains Chumash Village, a site where the Chumash tribe once lived.  The village has been recreated for educational purposes, and visitors can book an appointment for a guided tour or presentation. There is a form that you can fill out on the Wishtoyo website, and you should receive a response within 24 hours. Visiting Chumash Village is a hands on experience that is fun and informative for people of all ages. Many local school districts take advantage of the opportunity to help their students learn about the history of the area.

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Nearby Camping + Lodging

(3 within a 30 mile radius)

Nearby Adventures

(36 within a 30 mile radius)

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