Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal

Eastern Sierra + White Mountains Area, California

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Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
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  • An early start on the Mount Whitney Trail.- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • A wooden bridge along the Mount Whitney Trail. - Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • Waste control is essential for such a heavily trafficked area.- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • Mount Whitney Trail.- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • Sign toward Lone Pine Lake.- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • Mirror Lake along the Mount Whitney Trail.- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • Bear-proof cannisters are essential to keep marmots from stealing food and destroying campsites.- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • The Mount Whitney Trail just before Trail Camp.- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • Sierra blue jay.- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • Sky pilot flower.- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • Night stars from Trail Camp.- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • A sign toward the Mountaineer Route.- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • Mount McAdie (13,799').- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • Trail Crest on the Mount Whitney Trail.- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • Looking west from Trail Crest toward Mount Hitchcock ( 13,184').- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • The view from Trail Crest.- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • Summit sign.- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • The summit shelter.- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • Views from Mount Whitney.- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • Enjoying sunrise from the summit of Mount Whitney.- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • A lush meadow along the Mount Whitney Trail.- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
  • Sunrise on Mount Whitney.- Mount Whitney Hike via Whitney Portal
Overview + Weather
Pros: 
Amazing views. Wildflowers. Alpine lakes.
Cons: 
Crowded. Permits are difficlut to obtain. Bear and marmot country.
Region:
Eastern Sierra + White Mountains Area, CA
Congestion: 
High
Pets allowed: 
No
Net Elevation Gain: 
6,100.00 ft (1,859.28 m)
Parking Pass: 
Not Required
Preferable Season(s):
Spring, Summer, Fall
Suitable for: 
Hiking
Total Distance: 
22.00 mi (35.41 km)
Trail type: 
There-and-back
Trailhead Elevation: 
8,360.00 ft (2,548.13 m)
Current Local Weather:
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Hike Description

Hike Description

Pro Contributor

First called Fisherman’s Peak after the group of fishermen that reached the summit in 1873, California's Mount Whitney stands at 14,505 feet and is the highest summit in the contiguous United States. Thousands enjoy hiking Mount Whitney each year for premiere Serra Nevada views, whether on the lower trails on the mountain’s flanks or on one of the major approaches to the summit. Of these approaches, hiking on the Mount Whitney Trail that leaves from Whitney Portal is the most popular and accessible choice (for examples of alternative hikes, see the Cottonwood Pack Station and Mountaineers Route articles).

The 22-mile round-trip Mount Whitney Trail is often a hiker’s first experience with high-altitudes, which is certainly a factor to consider when planning the pace of an ascent. Strong and experienced hikers can complete the Mount Whitney Trail in one long day, but for most, a two-day approach provides much needed time for rest and acclimatization. Many hikers on this two-day schedule will camp at Trail Camp, which sits at 12,039 feet and a little over 6 miles from the trailhead. Outpost Camp, at 10,360 feet, is another good option.

The 4-hour hike from the Whitney Portal Trailhead to Trail Camp includes stream crossings, bridges, a variety of alpine flowers in the summer, a potential side-hike to Lone Pine Lake, and a constant view of the extraordinary ridges and mountains that surround the trail. The camp has plenty of dedicated sites, and a small lake nearby for a summer water source (filtering is essential). If you do camp in the area, keep in mind that marmot activity is very high; protect your food and your belongings in bear-proof containers and make sure your trash is neatly packed away.

An alpine start around 2 a.m. is not unusual on summit day. Light trails from the headlamps of fellow hikers are visible toward the trail crest in the early morning. A grueling section of ascent known as the 99 switchbacks awaits, though you can console yourself that it is really only 97 switchbacks to Trail Crest, where the John Muir Trail intersects with the Mount Whitney Trail. If you reach Trail Crest by sunrise, you will have incredible views of Mount Hitchcock and Hitchcock Lakes west of the trail. From Trail Crest, you’ll have another 2 miles or so to the summit. A lonely shelter sits atop the peak, and you’ll find a summit book to record your achievement in a box on an outside wall. Once you’ve appreciated the summit views, the daylight descent provides new views of Sequoia National Park. While retracing the 99 switchbacks to camp and then continuing on to the trailhead can feel grueling, the sense of accomplishment and the splendid views are palpable.

This particular trail and camp approach is very popular, and any effort to minimize trail and camping impact is essential. Practice a Leave No Trace ethic, which includes packing out all waste once on the trail. Also, the Forest Service has prepared some helpful planning materials. Finally, be sure to prepare yourself for the trip by understanding the terrain, the weather, the area wildlife, and the tricky lottery permitting system. The Whitney Portal hike to Mount Whitney's summit is one of the most rewarding hikes in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, so be sure to take the endeavor seriously to ensure a successful and enjoyable trip.

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Location + Directions

Location + Directions

Nearby Camping + Lodging

(13 within a 30 mile radius)

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(42 within a 30 mile radius)

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Published in collaboration with Black Diamond

At Black Diamond, we're a company of users. What began with a backyard anvil and a hammer has now grown into a global company with offices on three continents. Black Diamond is a company that's not just for rock climbers and skiers, but one that stands for the spirit of the sports we live, their values and goals, past, present and future. Since 1957, our innovative gear designs have set the standard in numerous areas. This is partly the result of dedication, desire and diligence on the part of an incredible team of people. It's also a product of the fact that each of us are climbers and skiers ourselves.

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