Share:

San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks

San Gabriel + San Bernardino Mountains, California

Start Exploring
San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks

Share:

Advertisement
  • At the start of the trail.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • Entering the San Gorgonio Wilderness about 1 mile in.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • Looking north from the trail.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • The trail is well shaded.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • Parts of the trail are exposed to full sun.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • The trail flattens a bit after 3 miles of hiking.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • A flatter section of the Angelus Oaks Trail.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • Pine along a flatter section of the Angelus Oaks Trail.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • A flatter section of the Angelus Oaks Trail.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • Pine along a flatter section of the Angelus Oaks Trail.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • Ascending through pine forest along the Angelus Oaks Trail.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • The trail is well marked.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • Ponderosa along the Angelus Oaks Trail.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • Trail signage.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • Wide views from the Angelus Oaks Trail.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • Wide views from the Angelus Oaks Trail.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • The Washington Monument along the Angelus Oaks Trail.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • The Washington Monument along the Angelus Oaks Trail.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • The view from the summit of San Bernadino Peak.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • A ridge near the summit of San Bernardino Peak.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • Wide views from San Bernardino Peak.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • Wide views from San Bernardino Peak.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • Wide views from San Bernardino Peak.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • Wide views from San Bernardino Peak.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • Manzanita along the Angelus Oaks Trail.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
  • The summit register atop San Bernardino Peak.- San Bernardino Peak via Angelus Oaks
Overview + Weather
Pros: 
Great view. Shaded.
Cons: 
Crowds. Permit can be hard to get. Rough road to the trailhead.
Advertisement
Region:
San Gabriel + San Bernardino Mountains, CA
Congestion: 
High
Pets allowed: 
Yes
Net Elevation Gain: 
4,777.00 ft (1,456.03 m)
Parking Pass: 
California Adventure Pass
Preferable Season(s):
Spring, Summer, Fall
Total Distance: 
16.00 mi (25.75 km)
Trail type: 
There-and-back
Trailhead Elevation: 
6,017.00 ft (1,833.98 m)
Current Local Weather:
Advertisement
Hike Description

Hike Description

Pro Contributor

Rising 5 miles away from San Gorgonio, one of Southern California's most popular peaks, San Bernardino Peak often gets overlooked. The trail to the summit is no less beautiful. Long, steep, and difficult, the summit tops out at 10,649 feet with 4,600 feet of elevation gain over its 8-mile course. Nobody said it would be easy, but it is still a very enjoyable summit.

The first challenge is getting the permit. It is best to reserve the permit in advance. You can get the permit ahead of time from the Mill Creek Ranger Station or via the San Gorgonio Wilderness Association. Some walk-in permits are available, too, should hikers prefer to wait until the day of.

To get to the trailhead, drive with caution down a quarter-mile of very bumpy dirt road. From the trailhead, the trail rises steeply for the first 1 or 2 miles, after which the trail levels in an area called Manzanita, where you have a 360-degree view of the surrounding peaks. From here, there is an optional short side trip to Columbine Spring, about a half-mile one way. The main trail continues to a small seasonal creek about a half-mile before Limber Pines, the next trail landmark.

Most casual backpackers who look to stay overnight can set up a camp around Limber Pines. The trail starts to steepen again toward Washington Monument and the summit ridge. Washington Monument was the east-west reference point from which all future surveys of Southern California were taken after Colonel Henry Washington and his survey party were directed to erect a monument atop San Bernardino Peak in 1852. Once you hit the ridge, the trail rolls before the last half-mile to the summit.

The summit area is pretty small, so it can get crowded over the weekend. There are still some shaded areas for a break before heading back down through the same way.

Updates, Tips + Comments

Updates, Tips + Comments

Field Guide

Field Guide

Download
Advertisement
Location + Directions

Location + Directions

Nearby Camping + Lodging

(25 within a 30 mile radius)

Nearby Adventures

(47 within a 30 mile radius)

Advertisement
Related Content

Related Content

Adventure Community

Adventure Community

Who Wants To Do It
15 Members
Who's Done It
5 Members
Submission by
Pro Contributor
61 Adventures Explored
58 Adventures Published

Newsletter Signup

Join the Outdoor Project Community

Get access to essential planning materials and information for your next adventure. Take a few seconds to join the community. It’s FREE!

Free Field Guides + Maps

Post Updates, Tips + Comments

Organize + Track Your Adventures

Insider Detailed Info, News + Benefits

Custom Driving Directions

Recommended Campsites, Photos + Reservation Info