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Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve

San Diego Metro Area, California

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Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve

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  • The trail from the entrance.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • Coast prickly pear cactus (Opuntia littoralis).- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • South Beach and Reserve entrance.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • The trail from the South Beach and Reserve entrance runs along a paved drive that has a fairly steep climb.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • Guy Fleming Trail.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • Guy Fleming Trail.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • Shaw's agave (Agave shawii).- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • View of the Pacific Ocean from Guy Fleming Trail.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • Beach sand verbena.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • Mojave yucca along the trail.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • View of the Pacific Ocean from Guy Fleming Trail.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • View of the cliffs from Razor Point Trail.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • Razor Point Trail.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • View of the cliffs and the Pacific Ocean from Razor Point Trail.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • Beach evening primrose (Camissoniopsis cheiranthifolia).- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • Coast prickly pear cactus with lanceleaf live-forever bud spike.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • Western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis).- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • View of the lodge (visitor center) and Whitaker Garden from High Point.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • Roadrunner (Geococcyx californianus).- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • Whale skull on display at the Torrey Pines Lodge (visitor center).- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • View of Los Peñasquitos Marsh Natural Preserve and the lower part of Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve from High Point.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • Torrey Pines Lodge (visitor center).- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • Red Butte.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • A fallen tree provides a habitat for insects and reptiles.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • View of the cliffs and the Pacific Ocean.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • The spur off of Razor Point Trail.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • View of the cliffs from Razor Point Trail.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • The cliffs.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • The cliffs and the Pacific Ocean.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • The Torrey pine (Pinus torreyana), after which the reserve was named.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
  • View from Broken Hill Overlook.- Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve
Overview + Weather
Pros: 
Unique geological formations. Great views. Wildflowers.
Cons: 
Can be crowded. Little shelter from sun.
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Region:
San Diego Metro Area, CA
Congestion: 
High
Pets allowed: 
No
Parking Pass: 
General Day Use Fee
Preferable Season(s):
Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall
Current Local Weather:
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Adventure Description

Adventure Description

Team

Named after the endangered Torrey pine (Pinus torreyana) that is endemic to the area, the Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve is also an important habitat for many other wildlife and vegetation species.

Ellen Browning Scripps was instrumental in the preservation of this area. The City of San Diego had set some land aside, but she funded the construction of the Torrey Pines Lodge (now used as a visitor center) and bequeathed the area to San Diego in 1932 with the request “that care be taken to preserve the natural beauty of the area”.

Today, eight trails throughout the park offer a variety of difficulty levels and types of scenery. From these trails, visitors can observe not only the Pinus torreyana, but also the unique geology of the ravine and cliffs overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Beach access is possible as well, connecting the reserve to the Torrey Pines State Beach.

Park at either the South Beach and Reserve Entrance or up at the visitor center. Entry fee varies from $10 to $15 depending on the season and day of week. Limited free parking is available along North Torrey Pines Road, but parking here requires an extra trek alongside the road, and you may decide your time is better spent in the gorgeous reserve. Note that due to the sensitive ecology, no dogs are allowed in the reserve, not even in a vehicle.

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Field Guide

Field Guide

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Location + Directions

Location + Directions

Nearby Camping + Lodging

(1 within a 30 mile radius)

Nearby Adventures

(44 within a 30 mile radius)

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