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Point Wolfe Beach Trail

Fundy National Park

Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick

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Point Wolfe Beach Trail

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  • Children happily carry their shoes so they can walk along the muddy edge of the water.- Point Wolfe Beach Trail
  • At high tide, this area will be filled with water.- Point Wolfe Beach Trail
  • Sea creatures cling to a hole in this wooden post.- Point Wolfe Beach Trail
  • This cluster of sea life gathered on a rock awaits the return of the water.- Point Wolfe Beach Trail
  • A couple strolls the rocky beach at low tide.- Point Wolfe Beach Trail
Overview + Weather
Pros: 
Nice woodland hike to beach. Amazing how fast the tide covers the beach.
Cons: 
None.
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Region:
Bay of Fundy, NB
Congestion: 
Moderate
Pets allowed: 
Yes, with restrictions
Net Elevation Gain: 
-133.00 ft (-40.54 m)
Parking Pass: 
General Day Use Fee
Preferable Season(s):
Spring, Summer, Fall
Total Distance: 
0.75 mi (1.20 km)
Trail type: 
There-and-back
Trailhead Elevation: 
153.00 ft (46.63 m)
Current Local Weather:
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Hike Description

Hike Description

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A great place to experience the world’s highest tides is at Fundy National Park’s Point Wolfe Beach. The moderate 11.2-kilometer round-trip trail leads from a parking lot through forest to the rocky beach. Arrive at low tide, and you can walk on the ocean floor. Some areas are muddy, but you can easily walk on the stones or climb on rocks. Watch for the small sea creatures that cling to the rocks waiting for the tide. Stay awhile and you’ll be amazed at the rapid rise of the tide. It’s interesting to see the outgoing water meet the incoming water as waves seem to reverse their direction. Get to higher ground and watch how quickly the beach becomes the ocean floor. A note of caution: As the tide moves in, always be aware of your exit.

Even though the village named Point Wolfe is long gone, you can see some evidence of the little town that once shipped lumber around the world. By the late 1800s the easily accessible trees had been cut. Fish populations were harmed by sawmill refuse. People began emigrating to other cities, and by 1922 the large mills and the spring log drives had become a part of the area’s history. Even though the village is gone, you can still find small pieces of brick from a 20-meter-tall smokestack that once stood at the Point Wolfe sawmill. Scour the beach; maybe you’ll find a piece of history.

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(2 within a 30 mile radius)

Nearby Adventures

(3 within a 30 mile radius)

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