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Mount Jo

Adirondacks, New York

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Mount Jo

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  • A well-groomed trail leads to the trailhead.- Mount Jo
  • The junction for the Long and Short trails. Many hikers ascend the Short Trail and descend the Long Trail.- Mount Jo
  • The Short Trail is much steeper with large rocks and large stones serving as steps.- Mount Jo
  • A large sheer rock wall on the way up the Long Trail.- Mount Jo
  • Approaching the summit.- Mount Jo
  • Planks to help avoid mud and keep hikers on the trail.- Mount Jo
  • A pair of ladders takes you to the summit.- Mount Jo
  • A couple reaches the false summit.- Mount Jo
  • As you reach the top, you first reach a false summit with this view of Indian Pass. The downward-sloping mountain is Wallface.- Mount Jo
  • A storm clears over the MacIntyre Range.- Mount Jo
  • Heart Lake in the foreground with the High Peaks Wilderness in the background.- Mount Jo
  • A couple enjoys the view.- Mount Jo
  • A squirrel stopped by the summit for a visit.- Mount Jo
  • A dike at the summit. These form when magma fills in the cracks of the rock and hardens. The magma is much harder, leaving a raised area after millennia of erosion.- Mount Jo
  • The view from the summit.- Mount Jo
  • Dark-eyed junco at the summit.- Mount Jo
  • - Mount Jo
Overview + Weather
Pros: 
Great views.
Cons: 
Parking may be crowded on weekends.
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Region:
Adirondacks, NY
Congestion: 
High
Pets allowed: 
Yes, with restrictions
Net Elevation Gain: 
710.00 ft (216.41 m)
Parking Pass: 
General Day Use Fee
Preferable Season(s):
Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall
Total Distance: 
2.60 mi (4.18 km)
Trail type: 
Loop
Trailhead Elevation: 
2,110.00 ft (643.13 m)
Typically multi-day: 
No
Current Local Weather:
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Hike Description

Hike Description

Contributor

Tucked back along the edge of the High Peaks Wilderness is a popular 2,876-foot mountain called Mount Jo that peers out into the Adirondack High Peaks. The mountain was named by Adirondack pioneer Henry Van Hoevenberg after his fiancée Josephine Schofield in 1877.

There are two trails leading to the peak of Mount Jo on the 710-foot ascent: the Long Trail is easy, measuring 1.3 miles, while the Short Trail is steeper and more difficult, measuring 1.1 miles. The trail splits shortly after the trailhead and rejoins at the top to create a loop should hikers want to experience both trails.

Along the way, hikers will encounter a variety of species of trees and birds and, upon arriving at the summit, a summit host to answer questions about the area.

Some of the dominant trees you will find in the Adirondacks are fir, hemlock, maple, and spruce. The unmistakable song of the hermit thrush can be heard emanating from the forest. Hikers will also note some of the geology on the Adirondacks in the rock on the summit. The Adirondack mountains are mainly composed of anorthosite. You may notice vein-like protrusions in the rock. These hardened magma-filled cracks are known as “dikes,” and they weather much slower than the anorthosite, causing them to stick out.

Once at the summit, hikers will enjoy views of the High Peaks including the MacIntyre Range, the Great Range, Mount Marcy, and Mount Colden. To the right, Indian Pass can be seen with the distinct, flat-sided profile of Wallface Mountain noting the area.

In the foreground lies Heart Lake, the centerpiece to the property, which is owned by the Adirondack Mountain Club. Visitors can swim and paddle on Heart Lake and camp in the nearby campgrounds. Adirondack Loj is also available to accommodate guests.

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Nearby Camping + Lodging

(6 within a 30 mile radius)

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(56 within a 30 mile radius)

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