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The High Line

New York City Metro Area, New York

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The High Line

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  • The High Line. Photo by Tony Webster (CC 2.0).- The High Line
  • - The High Line
  • - The High Line
  • The High Line. Photo by Gryffindor (CC 3.0).- The High Line
  • Fall flowers bloom on the High Line Trail.- The High Line
  • Overlooking the Hudson train yards.- The High Line
  • Runners, walkers, and strollers enjoy using this path that overlooks the city.- The High Line
  • In places the original tracks are left behind to remind visitors of the trail's history.- The High Line
  • The path weaves its way through huge buildings in Manhattan.- The High Line
  • Catching the setting sun from the High Line is breathtaking.- The High Line
  • Plantings line the path, bringing a bit of green to offset the concrete, glass and steel.- The High Line
  • Asters bring a burst of color to the autumn garden.- The High Line
  • The path surface varies from section to section.- The High Line
  • A piece of the High Line travels across 10th avenue overlooking Chelsea.- The High Line
  • Bench detail on the High Line. Photo by joevare (CC 3.0).- The High Line
  • Benches on the High Line. Photo by David Berkowitz (CC 3.0).- The High Line
  • The old rail tracks on the High Line. Photo by Xauxa Håkan Svensson (CC 3.0).- The High Line
Overview + Weather
Pros: 
Easy access. Unique perspective of the city.
Cons: 
Can be crowded.
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Region:
New York City Metro Area, NY
Congestion: 
High
Pets allowed: 
No
Parking Pass: 
Not Required
Preferable Season(s):
Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall
Current Local Weather:
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Adventure Description

Adventure Description

Pro Contributor

See New York from an elevated perspective by taking a walk on the High Line. Once a rail line that carried train cars through the center of the city, today the elevated passageway is a beautiful park with gardens, picnic areas and scenic viewpoints. Built in 1934, the West Side Elevated Line helped improve safety for pedestrians in Manhattan and delivered goods directly to warehouses downtown. As trucks became more popular than trains for citywide deliveries, the rail line began to see less and less use. In 1980, the tracks were abandoned for good.

It took until 2009 for the first section of the High Line to open to the public. Each section has its own character and unique features. At the north end of the park, the High Line descends to ground level at 34th Street. As you walk south, the path provides unobstructed views of the Hudson River. Continue south to see the Pershing Square beams, an area of original decking uncovered for visitors to enjoy. Other areas of interest include a lawn, thickets of trees, native plantings, public art and food carts.

The High Line terminates in an overlook at its southern end facing the Meatpacking District and the Whitney Museum of American Art. The rail line that used to continue from here was demolished in 1980.

You can access the High Line at eleven different points along the route. The park is open from 7 a.m. to sunset.

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Location + Directions

Location + Directions

Nearby Camping + Lodging

(1 within a 30 mile radius)

Nearby Adventures

(16 within a 30 mile radius)

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