Share:

Netul River/South Slough Loop Trail

Northern Oregon Coast, Oregon

Start Exploring
Netul River/South Slough Loop Trail

Share:

  • Boardwalk along the Lewis and Clark (Netul) River.- Netul River/South Slough Loop Trail
  • View southeast across the Lewis and Clark (Netul) River.- Netul River/South Slough Loop Trail
  • View southeast across the Lewis and Clark (Netul) River.- Netul River/South Slough Loop Trail
  • Boardwalk along the Netul River Trail.- Netul River/South Slough Loop Trail
  • Baldhip rose (Rosa gymnocarpa).- Netul River/South Slough Loop Trail
  • Cow parsnip (Heracleum maximum).- Netul River/South Slough Loop Trail
  • Unidentified sedge species (help us identify it by providing feedback).- Netul River/South Slough Loop Trail
  • Slough and footbridge along the Netul River Trail.- Netul River/South Slough Loop Trail
  • Footbridge along the Netul River Trail.- Netul River/South Slough Loop Trail
  • Netul River Trail.- Netul River/South Slough Loop Trail
  • Moss-adorned rocks along the South Slough Trail.- Netul River/South Slough Loop Trail
  • South Slough Trail.- Netul River/South Slough Loop Trail
  • Skunk cabbage (Lysichiton americanum) along the South Slough Trail.- Netul River/South Slough Loop Trail
  • South Slough Trail.- Netul River/South Slough Loop Trail
  • South Slough Trail.- Netul River/South Slough Loop Trail
  • View looking south along the South Slough Trail.- Netul River/South Slough Loop Trail
  • - Netul River/South Slough Loop Trail
Overview + Weather
Pros: 
Bird watching. Trail travels through diverse landscapes.
Cons: 
Steep trail near the southern end of the loop.
Region:
Northern Oregon Coast, OR
Congestion: 
Moderate
Pets allowed: 
No
Net Elevation Gain: 
160.00 ft (48.77 m)
Parking Pass: 
Not Required
Preferable Season(s):
Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall
Total Distance: 
2.60 mi (4.18 km)
Trail type: 
Loop
Trailhead Elevation: 
30.00 ft (9.14 m)
Current Local Weather:
Published in collaboration with
Hike Description

Hike Description

Sponsored Contributor

The Corps of Discovery originally intended to establish a winter camp on the northern banks of the Columbia River in what is now Washington. Advice from the Clatsop people and exhaustion with a diet consisting exclusively of salmon led the group to unanimously agree to relocate to the river's south side, where elk and deer were said to be ubiquitous.  Meriwether Lewis and five men scouted the southern shoreline in and around Youngs Bay, and on December 7, 1805, the entire Corps of Discovery began constructing Fort Clatsop just off the banks of the Netul River.*  By Christmas of that year the fort was occupied.

Much has obviously changed since then, but the Netul River and the boggy landscape that flank its shores look much as they did back in 1805.

Hiking next to the river, over forested hilltops and through native wetlands, this 2.7-mile interpretive loop provides a unique insight into what the Corps of Discovery would have experienced over 200 years ago.  Bring your binoculars as great blue herons and numerous other waterfowl nest along the river's banks and throughout the Southern Slough.

*Both the Clatsop natives and Lewis and Clark referred to the river, which originates just south of Saddle Mountain, as the "Netul," but in 1925 the name was changed to the Lewis and Clark River.  Today, not to completely confuse visitors, you will see signage using both names.

Updates, Tips + Comments

Updates, Tips + Comments

Field Guide + Trail Map

Field Guide + Trail Map

Download
Published in collaboration with
Location + Directions

Location + Directions

Nearby Camping + Lodging

(5 within a 30 mile radius)

Nearby Adventures

(38 within a 30 mile radius)

Published in collaboration with
Related Content

Related Content

Adventure Community

Adventure Community

Who Wants To Do It
14 Members
Who's Done It
7 Members
Submission by
Sponsored Contributor
1275 Adventures Explored
1273 Adventures Published

Published in collaboration with The People's Coast

A profound concept originally envisioned by governor Oswald West, in 1967 the Oregon legislature ultimately realized his vision of making the entire Oregon Coast forever open to the public in a piece of landmark legislation titled the Oregon Beach Bill, officially making all 363 miles public land. "The People's Coast" is truly a one-of-a-kind coastline, a unique blend of mountains and rocky stacks, towering old growth forests, marine sanctuaries, tide pools and kelp forests, charming towns, historic fishing communities, world-class golfing, breweries, and simply jaw-dropping scenic beaches. We encourage you to plan your next trip at visittheoregoncoast.com or by calling (541) 574-2679.

Newsletter Signup

Join the Outdoor Project Community

Get access to essential planning materials and information for your next adventure. Take a few seconds to join the community. It’s FREE!

Free Field Guides + Maps

Post Updates, Tips + Comments

Organize + Track Your Adventures

Insider Detailed Info, News + Benefits

Custom Driving Directions

Recommended Campsites, Photos + Reservation Info