Share:

Niagara County Park

Willamette Foothills, Oregon

Start Exploring
Niagara County Park

Share:

Advertisement
  • View of North Santiam River looking east at Niagara County Park.- Niagara County Park
  • Niagara County Park basalt chasm.- Niagara County Park
  • Niagara County Park basalt chasm.- Niagara County Park
  • Basalt outcroppings at Niagara County Park's western end.- Niagara County Park
  • A small waterfall from Sevenmile Creek.- Niagara County Park
  • Niagara County Park.- Niagara County Park
  • Niagara County Park vault toilet facility.- Niagara County Park
  • Powder House Trail at Niagara County Park.- Niagara County Park
  • Swimming hole at Niagara County Park's eastern end.- Niagara County Park
  • Swimming hole at Niagara County Park's eastern end.- Niagara County Park
  • Swimming hole at Niagara County Park's eastern end.- Niagara County Park
  • Swimming hole at Niagara County Park's eastern end.- Niagara County Park
  • A powder house from the 1890s dam construction.- Niagara County Park
  • Swimming hole at Niagara County Park's eastern end.- Niagara County Park
Overview + Weather
Pros: 
Scenic waterfalls and a narrow basalt chasm. Swimming holes on the eastern end.
Cons: 
Cliff jumping/swimming not permitted at the craggy western end of park.
Advertisement
Region:
Willamette Foothills, OR
Congestion: 
Moderate
Pets allowed: 
Yes
Parking Pass: 
Not Required
Preferable Season(s):
Spring, Summer, Fall
Current Local Weather:
Advertisement
Adventure Description

Adventure Description

Team

A dramatically tight gauntlet of basalt pinching the North Santiam River, side waterfalls, a unique history, numerous swimming holes, and a naturally forested riverbank make Niagara County Park one of Marion County’s most popular recreation destinations.

The park is well-known for being the site of a failed masonry hydroelectric dam during the turn of the 20th century.  Centered around the town of Niagara, which once featured a hotel, a tavern, and the country's smallest post office(6 feet by 8 feet, closed in 1934), the dam was supposed to power a straw-to-paper mill, but both projects were scrapped by 1912 due to construction difficulties and constant flooding and erosion.

Today, remnants of the site’s history linger.  Ruins of the masonry dam remain on the park's western end below the observation area, and if you head east on the Powder House Trail you will find the trail's namesake.  The small wood shed powder house, logically located far from the blasting site, kept explosives dry during dam construction.

Due to past safety issues, the western end of the park adjacent to the main parking area and featuring the narrow basalt chasm and outcroppings is unfortunately closed for any kind of swimming.  Swimming in the river toward the central and eastern end of the park is permitted, however, and the area features huge and level slabs of rock that are perfect for soaking up the mid-summer sun.

Updates, Tips + Comments

Updates, Tips + Comments

Field Guide

Field Guide

Download
Advertisement
Location + Directions

Location + Directions

Nearby Camping + Lodging

(42 within a 30 mile radius)

Nearby Adventures

(77 within a 30 mile radius)

Advertisement
Related Content

Related Content

Adventure Community

Adventure Community

Who Wants To Do It
124 Members
Who's Done It
15 Members
Submission by
Team
1266 Adventures Explored
1264 Adventures Published

Newsletter Signup

Join the Outdoor Project Community

Get access to essential planning materials and information for your next adventure. Take a few seconds to join the community. It’s FREE!

Free Field Guides + Maps

Post Updates, Tips + Comments

Organize + Track Your Adventures

Insider Detailed Info, News + Benefits

Custom Driving Directions

Recommended Campsites, Photos + Reservation Info