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Trillium Lake Sledding

Trillium Lake Sno-Park

Mt. Hood + Clackamas River Area, Oregon

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Trillium Lake Sledding

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  • Measuring wits and wisdom. The clearing is generous enough for some safe run-outs.- Trillium Lake Sledding
  • A little sculpting can spice up a short and steep run.- Trillium Lake Sledding
  • - Trillium Lake Sledding
  • - Trillium Lake Sledding
  • - Trillium Lake Sledding
Overview + Weather
Pros: 
Close to Portland. Free sledding. Vehicle access. Variety of terrain.
Cons: 
Can be crowded. Some trees to avoid. Small sledding area.
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Region:
Mt. Hood + Clackamas River Area, OR
Access: 
Vehicle
Congestion: 
High
Max slope angle: 
15-30 degrees
Parking Pass: 
Sno-Park Parking Permit (required in OR + WA 11.01 thru 04.30)
Current Local Weather:
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Adventure Description

Adventure Description

Team

Whether you are in the area for a ski around Trillium Lake or a night at Timberline Lodge, the steep chutes tucked away at the end of the Trillium Lake parking lot have everything the enthusiast could want for a solid afternoon of sledding. The area is a nice alternative to Snow Bunny, which is right across the highway. If one hill is too crowded, take a look at the other! Both are good options for families. You will find enough variation in slope and terrain to accommodate the aspirations of the timid and bold alike, and you may even find some help if you want to construct some of your own routes and jumps - just bring your own shovel. If you can’t find a route that looks good to you, move into the woods a little to see if something opens up; just make sure you avoid those firs. A longer, gentler sledding trail extends from the main sledding area down toward the lake.

Named for the trillium plant that flowers in the area through spring and summer, Trillium Lake was formed in 1960 when the state Department of Fish and Wildlife dammed Mud Creek. Prior to its flooding, the area was more of a meadow and marsh land. Those traveling on the Oregon Trail actually traveled across the area using a “corduroy road,” a road built from logs laid down beside each other and covered with sand. 
 

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Location + Directions

Nearby Camping + Lodging

(61 within a 30 mile radius)

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(144 within a 30 mile radius)

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