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Lime Cement Plant

Western Treasure Valley, Oregon

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Lime Cement Plant

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  • The lime cement plant in Lime, Oregon, was abandoned in 1980.- Lime Cement Plant
  • Lime cement plant in Lime, Oregon.- Lime Cement Plant
  • The lime cement plant in Lime, Oregon, was abandoned in 1980.- Lime Cement Plant
  • The lime cement plant in Lime, Oregon, was abandoned in 1980.- Lime Cement Plant
  • The lime cement plant in Lime, Oregon, was abandoned in 1980.- Lime Cement Plant
  • Lime cement plant in Lime, Oregon.- Lime Cement Plant
  • Lime cement plant in Lime, Oregon.- Lime Cement Plant
  • Lime cement plant in Lime, Oregon.- Lime Cement Plant
  • Lime cement plant in Lime, Oregon.- Lime Cement Plant
  • Lime cement plant in Lime, Oregon.- Lime Cement Plant
  • Lime cement plant in Lime, Oregon.- Lime Cement Plant
Overview + Weather
Pros: 
Massive abandoned cement plant. Adjacent to I-84.
Cons: 
Hazardous debris. Not close to anything.
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Region:
Western Treasure Valley, OR
Congestion: 
Low
Pets allowed: 
No
Parking Pass: 
Not Required
Preferable Season(s):
Spring, Fall
Current Local Weather:
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Adventure Description

Adventure Description

Pro Contributor

This abandoned place in far eastern Oregon stands as a kind of modern ghost town, a relic of Cold-War-era industry that was abandoned in 1980 and quickly fell into disrepair. Now joining the ranks of American ghost towns, it makes an adventurous attraction near I-84 for those who enjoy the aesthetic of ruin.

Lime, Oregon, is located along the Oregon Trail, and thus has a long history. It was first incorporated and received a post office in 1899. Known for the area's deposits of limestone, the town's main industry soon became lime production, and later plaster. In 1921, a cement company bought the plaster operation and converted it to make cement, some of which was used in the Owyhee Dam. Production accelerated and continued throughout the 1960s and 1970s, but eventually the limestone resource waned and depleted. Cement production moved to nearby Durkee, where it continues today.

The old Lime plant closed in 1980, the small town dissolved, and very little was ever demolished. The structures and machinery are now crumbling in almost-artful ways, and many surfaces have been tagged with interesting graffiti. The site begs exploration and compelling photography, but visitors must use extreme caution. There are many sharp edges, precarious walls and ceilings, and unstable floors, among many other hazards lingering in this old factory. Enter at your own risk, and heed any posted warnings.

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