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Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail

Bryce Canyon National Park

Zion + Bryce Canyon Area, Utah

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Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail

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  • View into Bryce Canyon's Silent City from Sunset Point.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • View south toward Bryce Point from Sunset Point.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • Looking into Bryce Canyon's Silent City.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • Descending into the Silent City on the Navajo Loop Trail.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • Navajo Loop Trail.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • View inside Bryce Canyon's Silent City through Wall Street along Navajo Loop Trail.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • View inside Bryce Canyon's Silent City through Wall Street along Navajo Loop Trail.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • View inside Bryce Canyon's Silent City through Wall Street along Navajo Loop Trail.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) from within the Silent City.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • Navajo Loop Trail.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • Hoodoo along the Navajo and Queen's Garden Loop Trail.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) along the Navajo and Queen's Garden Loop Trail.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • Navajo and Queen's Garden Loop Trail.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • Twisted ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis).- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • Navajo and Queen's Garden Loop Trail.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • Navajo and Queen's Garden Loop Trail.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • Bryce Canyon's Queen's Garden.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • Weathered ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) along the Queen's Garden Loop Trail.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • Queen's Garden Loop Trail.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • Hoodoos along the Queen's Garden Loop Trail.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) along the Queen's Garden Loop Trail.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • Hoodoos along the Bryce Canyon's Queen's Garden Loop Trail.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
  • Hoodoos along the Bryce Canyon's Queen's Garden Loop Trail.- Navajo + Queen's Garden Loop Trail
Overview + Weather
Pros: 
Hike through Bryce Canyon's iconic Silent City. Panoramic views.
Cons: 
Very heavily used. Snow-packed in winter.
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Region:
Zion + Bryce Canyon Area, UT
Congestion: 
High
Pets allowed: 
No
Net Elevation Gain: 
600.00 ft (182.88 m)
Parking Pass: 
National Park Pass
Preferable Season(s):
Winter, Spring, Fall
Total Distance: 
2.90 mi (4.67 km)
Trail type: 
Loop
Trailhead Elevation: 
8,010.00 ft (2,441.45 m)
Current Local Weather:
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Hike Description

Hike Description

Team

Combining the Navajo Loop Trail's descent into the Silent City and the Queen's Garden Trail you get Bryce Canyon National Park's most iconic and popular day hike. It's an absolutely unique experience you won't find anywhere else on earth!

2.9 miles in total length, the trail starts at Sunset Point, where you'll quickly hike a down 500 feet on a steep set of switchbacks into the vibrant orange, unworldly Silent City. The Silent City is the park's densest clustering of eroded pinnacle-like formations, called hoodoos.* Here, traveling through the slot canyon referred to as Wall Street, canyon walls tower hundreds of feet above the trail where the Utah desert's clear blue sky provides incredible contrast to the sedimentary rock.

Passing through Wall Street, the amphitheater slowly opens to Bryce Creek and the high desert landscape dominated by ponderosa pines, western junipers, and green manzanita brush. Climbing back up to the canyon rim,** you'll enjoy passing through the Queen's Garden, a loose cluster of hoodoos, where views open as far east as the neighboring Escalante Mountains.

* Hoodoos are thin, spire-like formations commonly found in arid drainages of sedimentary rock. Over time, weather erodes softer rock and leaves harder rock to remain. In contrast to spires or pinnacles, hoodoos are distinct because of their variable form and thickness that reflects differentiation in the hardness of the soil/rock.

** Geologically speaking, Bryce Canyon is technically not considered a canyon; rather, it is a series of amphitheaters on the eastern edge of the Paunsaugunt Plateau.

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Nearby Camping + Lodging

(4 within a 30 mile radius)

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(19 within a 30 mile radius)

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