North Overlook

Cedar Breaks National Monument

Zion + Bryce Canyon Area, Utah

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North Overlook

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  • Walking up to the overlook.- North Overlook
  • Spectators enjoying the panoramic vistas at the North Overlook.- North Overlook
  • Looking southwest toward Point Supreme and the heart of the park.- North Overlook
  • Looking southwest toward Point Supreme and the heart of the park.- North Overlook
  • Such phenomenal beauty.- North Overlook
  • The view from the Markagunt Plateau looking at the Ashdown Gorge Wilderness and Cedar City beyond.- North Overlook
  • The view from the Markagunt Plateau looking at the Ashdown Gorge Wilderness and Cedar City beyond.- North Overlook
  • The view from the Markagunt Plateau looking at the Ashdown Gorge Wilderness and Cedar City beyond.- North Overlook
  • The view to the northwest.- North Overlook
  • The view from the Markagunt Plateau looking at the Ashdown Gorge Wilderness and Cedar City beyond.- North Overlook
  • The view from the Markagunt Plateau looking at the Ashdown Gorge Wilderness and Cedar City beyond.- North Overlook
  • Way up there!- North Overlook
Overview + Weather
Pros: 
Beautiful views. Accessible in winter.
Cons: 
Just an overlook.
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Region:
Zion + Bryce Canyon Area, UT
Congestion: 
Moderate
Pets allowed: 
Yes, with restrictions
Parking Pass: 
National Park Pass
Preferable Season(s):
Summer, Fall
Current Local Weather:
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Adventure Description

Adventure Description

Pro Contributor

The North Overlook at Cedar Breaks National Monument provides great views to the south and west of the giant natural amphitheater. It is the last stop in the monument before you head toward the town and ski resort of Brian Head. Because the overlook is north of the winter road closure, you can access it by car in winter, unlike the other overlooks in the area. The elevation here is 10,400 feet, so expect the weather to be cold and unpredictable at any time of year.

The geology of the area is a fascinating. At one point the area was completely underwater; the sandstone was shoved up by tectonic activity and later eroded by the heavy precipitation this area gets thanks to its steep heights. The yellows and reds come from iron oxides and the purples from manganese oxide. You can see a white layer on top, which is volcanic pumice from an explosion around 30 million years ago. It is even more impressive in winter when snow sits on the hoodoos and spires.

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Location + Directions

Location + Directions

Nearby Camping + Lodging

(1 within a 30 mile radius)

Nearby Adventures

(26 within a 30 mile radius)

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