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Seward Park Sea Kayaking

Lake Washington, Seattle

Seattle + Tacoma Metro Area, Washington

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Seward Park Sea Kayaking

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  • The south end of Seward Park. A bouy displays the posted speed limit.- Seward Park Sea Kayaking
  • Parkgoers enjoying a small beach at Seward Park.- Seward Park Sea Kayaking
  • Looking north at I-90. Seward Park to the left and Mercer Island to the right.- Seward Park Sea Kayaking
  • Fishing from a boat off the coast of Seward Park.- Seward Park Sea Kayaking
  • A beach on the north side of Seward Park.- Seward Park Sea Kayaking
  • Looking at the Seattle Skyline from the waters off of Seward Park.- Seward Park Sea Kayaking
  • The north shore of Seward Park.- Seward Park Sea Kayaking
  • Fisherman on a dock in Andrews Bay.- Seward Park Sea Kayaking
  • Andrews Bay is a popular anchorage for many Seattle boaters.- Seward Park Sea Kayaking
  • Swimmers enjoying the beach at the south end of Andrews Bay.- Seward Park Sea Kayaking
  • Looking east toward Seward Park accross Andrews Bay.- Seward Park Sea Kayaking
  • Floating in Andrews Bay.- Seward Park Sea Kayaking
  • A floatplane is pushed around Lake Washington.- Seward Park Sea Kayaking
  • Returning to the south end of Seward Park.- Seward Park Sea Kayaking
Overview + Weather
Pros: 
Close to Seattle. Easy access. Nice park to paddle around.
Cons: 
Busy. Limited parking. Lots of boat and air traffic.
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Region:
Seattle + Tacoma Metro Area, WA
Congestion: 
High
Site characteristics: Water: 
Lake
Motorized watercraft allowed: 
Yes
Parking Pass: 
Not Required
Portage required: 
No
Preferable Season(s):
Spring, Summer, Fall
Water difficulty: 
Easy / Class A
Current Local Weather:
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Paddle Description

Paddle Description

Contributor

Located entirely on the Bailey Peninsula, the 300-acre Seward Park provides an excellent backdrop for a short kayaking adventure on Lake Washington. Named after former U.S. Secretary of State William Seward, who was responsible for the purchase of Alaska in 1867, many people considered the island too far from Seattle for practical purposes. Seattle Park Superintendent E. O. Schwagerl and the Olmsted Brothers preserved and purchased the island in 1911 as part of their Seattle Parks Plan. Bailey Island became a peninsula in 1916 with the completion of the ship canal and locks and subsequent lowering of the water level of Lake Washington.

Today, the park has one of the last surviving old-growth forests in Seattle's city limits, and it is home to owls, bats, a pair of bald eagles, and Peruvian conures. The Seward Park Environmental and Audubon Center offers many free and low-cost nature education programs.

Kayaking around this park offers views of Mount Rainier, the Seattle skyline, and even the occasional floatplane. On the western side of the park sits Andrew's Bay, which is a popular anchorage for many boats in the summer. The waters around Seward Park are very popular for fishing from the shore, docks, and boats. After the sun sets, the park stands out as a dark area amidst the the lighted shores on nearby sections of Lake Washington.

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Location + Directions

Location + Directions

Nearby Camping + Lodging

(3 within a 30 mile radius)

Nearby Adventures

(106 within a 30 mile radius)

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