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Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe

Seattle + Tacoma Metro Area, Washington

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Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe

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  • Paddling adjacent to Marsh Island and WA Hwy 520.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Paddling adjacent to Marsh Island.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • View of Marsh and Foster Island with the Arboretum Waterfront Trail.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • View of Marsh and Foster Island with the Arboretum Waterfront Trail.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • A heron haven.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Fragrant water lily (Nymphaea odorata) or "beaver root".- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Fragrant water lily (Nymphaea odorata) or "beaver root".- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Great blue heron (Ardea herodias).- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Still water.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos).- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Kayakers entering the water from the Washington Park Arboretum.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Lily pads everywhere.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Paddling next to a beaver.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos).- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Great blue heron (Ardea herodias) on marsh Island. - Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Kayakers at Washington Park Arboretum.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Paddling under WA Hwy 520.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Paddling under WA Hwy 520.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Female wood duck (Aix sponsa).- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Female wood duck (Aix sponsa).- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Fragrant water lily (Nymphaea odorata) or "beaver root".- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Canada Geese (Branta canadensis).- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos).- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Paddling Washington Park Arboretum.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Paddling Washington Park Arboretum.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Paddling Washington Park Arboretum.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos).- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Paddling Washington Park Arboretum.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Paddling Washington Park Arboretum.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Taking-out and collapsing kayaks at West Montlake Park.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Taking-out and collapsing kayaks at West Montlake Park.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • Taking-out and collapsing kayaks at West Montlake Park.- Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
  • - Washington Park Arboretum Kayak/Canoe
Overview + Weather
Pros: 
Wildlife. Easy access from Seattle. Easy paddling for all ages.
Cons: 
Roadway cuts through paddle route.
Region:
Seattle + Tacoma Metro Area, WA
Congestion: 
Low
Site characteristics: Water: 
Lake
Parking Pass: 
Not Required
Portage required: 
No
Preferable Season(s):
Spring, Summer, Fall
Water difficulty: 
Easy / Class A
Current Local Weather:
Published in collaboration with
Paddle Description

Paddle Description

Sponsored Contributor

The Washington Park Arboretum is nestled into the shoreline of Lake Washington, just south of the UW Husky Football Stadium. The Arboretum itself is a 230-acre site jointly managed by the University of Washington and the City of Seattle. The University of Washington Waterfront Activities Center provides the perfect opportunity for those that don’t own a canoe or rowboat to spend some time paddling; the general public can rent canoes and rowboats for $9 per hour on weekdays or $11 per hour on weekends. The hourly rental fee is worth it to gain paddling access to hundreds of acres of the Washington Park Arboretum that contains over 40,000 trees, shrubs and vines from all around the world. The Arboretum is also home to a population of beavers and numerous bird species.

The Washington Park Arboretum was established in 1934 through a joint agreement by the University of Washington (Board of Regents) and the City of Seattle (City Council and Mayor). For the six decades prior to the agreement, the Washington Park area was logging land for the Puget Mill Company. In 1920, the entire site was split into two parcels: one became the 230-acre Washington Park and the other became the 200-acre Broadmoor Golf Club.

You can also access the Arboretum from West Montlake Park via the Montlake Cut. This put-in location will afford additional opportunities to explore the water, houseboats, and marina of Portage Bay, but passage through the Montlake Cut should only be undertaken with a sea worthy kayak and not a canoe as waters can become extremely choppy with the passing of larger motor boats.

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Updates, Tips + Comments

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Field Guide + Map

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Location + Directions

Location + Directions

Nearby Camping + Lodging

(3 within a 30 mile radius)

Nearby Adventures

(97 within a 30 mile radius)

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