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Kalaloch Big Cedar Tree + Grove

Olympic National Park

Western Olympic Peninsula, Washington

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Kalaloch Big Cedar Tree + Grove

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  • Big Cedar Tree.- Kalaloch Big Cedar Tree + Grove
  • Big Cedar Tree.- Kalaloch Big Cedar Tree + Grove
  • Big Cedar Tree with a western hemlock hitchhiker.- Kalaloch Big Cedar Tree + Grove
  • Big Cedar Tree.- Kalaloch Big Cedar Tree + Grove
  • Big Cedar Tree, split from a March 8th, 2014 storm.- Kalaloch Big Cedar Tree + Grove
  • A cousin of the Big Cedar Tree in an adjacent grove.- Kalaloch Big Cedar Tree + Grove
  • Cousins of the Big Cedar Tree in an adjacent grove.- Kalaloch Big Cedar Tree + Grove
  • - Kalaloch Big Cedar Tree + Grove
Overview + Weather
Pros: 
Third largest western red cedar in the world.
Cons: 
A storm in March 2014 felled half of the tree.
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Region:
Western Olympic Peninsula, WA
Congestion: 
Moderate
Pets allowed: 
No
Parking Pass: 
Not Required
Preferable Season(s):
Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall
Current Local Weather:
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Adventure Description

Adventure Description

Team

Estimated to be roughly 1,000 years old, the Kalaloch Big Cedar Tree has been standing in the same location since the Byzantine Empire ruled Constantinople. It dates to a time when westerners had never even conceived of the American continents. However, this giant, the third* largest of its species at 175 feet tall, 19.8 feet in diameter, and 12,000 cubic feet in volume, split nearly in two after a heavy coastal storm on March 8, 2014.

Protected within the boundaries of Olympic National Park, the Kalaloch Big Cedar has avoided logging operations, the primary demise for most giants. Falling to wind and storms is actually the second most common end for trees, and old-growth trees are no strangers to such events. In fact, the tallest trees of most species are actually relatively young in comparison to their stouter and older relatives, as storms constantly topple limbs, tops, and even large portions of trees. In fertile regions such as the Olympics, however, the trees keep growing.

While visiting the giant, be sure to continue to explore eastward on a short quarter-mile trail that leads to a whole grove of ancient western red cedars (Thuja plicata).

* Also within Olympic National Park, the Quinault Giant Western Redcedar is the largest tree of the species.

Updates, Tips + Comments

Updates, Tips + Comments

Field Guide + Map

Field Guide + Map

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Location + Directions

Location + Directions

Nearby Camping + Lodging

(11 within a 30 mile radius)

Nearby Adventures

(23 within a 30 mile radius)

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