Mud Volcano Area

Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone, Wyoming

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Mud Volcano Area

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  • Churning Cauldron in Yellowstone National Park.- Mud Volcano Area
  • Close up of the thermal activity.- Mud Volcano Area
  • Informational sign for Churning Cauldron.- Mud Volcano Area
  • Informational sign for Black Dragons Cauldron- Mud Volcano Area
  • Black Dragon Cauldron in Yellowstone National Park.- Mud Volcano Area
  • Black Dragon Cauldron and Sour Lake.- Mud Volcano Area
  • Sour Lake in Yellowstone National Park.- Mud Volcano Area
  • View of the basin.- Mud Volcano Area
  • Mud Volcano in Yellowstone National Park.- Mud Volcano Area
  • Mud Volcano informational sign.- Mud Volcano Area
  • Dragons Mouth Spring in Yellowstone National Park.- Mud Volcano Area
  • Dragons Mouth Spring informational sign.- Mud Volcano Area
  • Sulfur pools near the parking area.- Mud Volcano Area
  • A close look at the interesting microbial life in the sulfur pools.- Mud Volcano Area
Overview + Weather
Pros: 
Variety of thermal features. Easy walk. Not Crowded.
Cons: 
None.
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Region:
Yellowstone, WY
Congestion: 
High
Pets allowed: 
No
Parking Pass: 
National Park Pass
Preferable Season(s):
Spring, Summer, Fall
Current Local Weather:
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Adventure Description

Adventure Description

Pro Contributor

The interesting mud pots and fumaroles of the Mud Volcano Area make for an excellent short walk as a stop between Yellowstone Lake and Grand Canyon of Yellowstone on the eastern half of Yellowstone National Park. Fumaroles are steam vents that leech sulfuric acid into the surrounding rock and boil away the ground water. This forms a feedback loop that breaks the rock into a sticky clay that bubbles almost constantly depending on the thermal activity of the specific feature.

There are over a dozen thermal features at the Mud Volcano site, many of which were revealed only as recently as the late 1970s when an earthquake caused the slope to give way and push the thermal activity closer to the surface. The barren area had soil temperatures pushing 200 degrees Fahrenheit and became known as “the cooking hillside.”

Bison frequent the upper areas of the nature walk, so keep an eye out and bring your camera. The bubbling thermal features have some of the strongest smells in the park, which is apparent when you see the way the landscape has been changed with these unique thermal features.

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Location + Directions

Location + Directions

Nearby Camping + Lodging

(11 within a 30 mile radius)

Nearby Adventures

(59 within a 30 mile radius)

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