Elevation Gain
?
Trail type
There-and-back
Distance
7.00 km (4.35 mi)
Warming hut
No
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Of the three mountains on Vancouver's north shore, Mount Seymour is the only one to offer unfettered winter access to the backcountry. From the backcountry parking lot, winter users can take a marked trail 3.5 kilometers to Pump Peak.

From the top of the parking lot the trail skirts the outside of the ski resort for the first 600 meters before deviating away from the resort onto the ridge to Brockton Point. The spruces and firs of the start of the trail become increasingly sparse as you approach Brockton Point.

From Brockton the trail dips into a delightful sheltered meadow below Pump Peak, a welcome respite before the steep ascent to Pump Peak. The marked trail ends 100 meters before Pump Peak, leaving you the option to admire the view to the north, or make the final push to the peak for near-360 degree views across the Lower Mainland, Georgia Strait, south to Mount Baker, and wild inland peaks.

Logistics + Planning

Preferable season(s)

Winter
Spring

Congestion

Moderate

Parking Pass

Not Required

Pros

Beutiful views. Accessible. Well-marked trail.

Cons

Crowds. Crosses avalanche terrain.

Pets allowed

Allowed with Restrictions

Trailhead Elevation

3,385.83 ft (1,032.00 m)

Net Elevation Gain

1,220.47 ft (372.00 m)

Features

Big vistas
Cross-country skiing

Location

Field Guide

Nearby Adventures

Nearby Lodging + Camping

Comments

03/06/2019
Despite Mount Seymours relatively low difficulty it is one of, if not the busiest peak for rescues. Common reasons include folks getting lost, early season snow causing slips, or leg injuries, and heat exhaustion. Most of these are easily prevented by minor preparations bringing a map and knowing the route in advance, and carrying the Ten Essentials. In winter avalanche training level 1 for at least one member of your group is a really good idea.

Key areas of risk are just beneath Brockton, where the trail gets very steep and can create small avalanches into terrain traps. Pump Peak has several steep faces that have avalanched in the past.


https://bc.ctvnews.ca/unprepared-hikers-rescued-from-mount-seymour-1.4183236
https://forums.clubtread.com/27-british-columbia/47077-mt-seymour-pump-peak-area-avalanche-feb-13-14-a.html
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/mount-seymour-hikers-rescued-1.4866055
https://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/rescue-crews-search-for-4-missing-hikers-at-mount-seymour
https://www.nsnews.com/news/heat-exhausted-hikers-and-dog-drive-up-north-shore-rescue-weekend-calls-1.23384560

https://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/search-resumes-for-missing-snowshoer-near-mount-seymour
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