Pets allowed
Allowed
Elevation Gain
?
Trail type
Loop
Distance
0.00 mi (0.00 km)
Please respect the outdoors by practicing Leave No Trace. Learn more about how to apply the principles of Leave No Trace on your next outdoor adventure here.

The Lake Sabrina Loop Trail starts at the Sabrina Basin Trailhead on the east side of the lake and dam and generally leads clockwise around the lake. After entering into the John Muir Wilderness and rounding the south side of the lake you will have to hike a narrow, rocky traverse along a steep ledge to get to the west side of the lake and to access the Middle Fork Bishop Creek inlet. After the traverse but before reaching the inlet you will come upon a fish camp that was originally established by the California Nevada Power Company workers who built the dam in 1908. Here the workers logged the old-growth Sierra pine forest for lumber to build the internal structure of the dam down stream. This damming of the Middle Fork of Bishop Creek created Lake Sabrina in order to supply constant water to several downstream hydroelectric plants.

After leaving the fish camp and passing the Middle Fork Inlet, the trail will take you around the west side of the lake. Come to a large rock slide that's made its way down to the edge of the lake and created very uneven and rocky terrain. After the rock slide you will encounter few rare western juniper trees near the shore that are only found on Middle Fork Bishop Creek in this region of the Sierra. Be sure to stop and enjoy their shade while you cast a line.

End your hike at the Inlet Trailhead, where you could also begin the trail and hike counterclockwise in the opposite direction. After arriving at the Inlet Trailhead, walk the road below the dam back to the Sabrina Basin Trailhead where you began.

The Lake Sabrina loop trail is a relatively short hike, although it may not be safe for small children or those with physical disabilities due to some sections with rough terrain. 

Logistics + Planning

Preferable season(s)

Spring
Summer
Fall

Congestion

Low

Parking Pass

Not Required

Pros

Beautiful views of the High Sierra. Great lake fishing. John Muir Wilderness access.

Cons

Rocky, uneven terrain. Low lake level.

Trailhead Elevation

9,092.00 ft (2,771.24 m)

Net Elevation Gain

860.00 ft (262.13 m)

Features

Backcountry camping
Historically significant
Mountaineering
Rock climbing
Waterfalls
Big vistas
Old-growth forest
Wildflowers
Fishing

Location

Field Guide

Nearby Adventures

Nearby Lodging + Camping

Eastern Sierra + White Mountains Area, California
Eastern Sierra + White Mountains Area, California

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