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Pets allowed
Allowed with Restrictions
Elevation Gain
675.00 ft (205.74 m)
Trail type
There-and-back
Distance
3.10 mi (4.99 km)
Please respect the outdoors by practicing Leave No Trace. Learn more about how to apply the principles of Leave No Trace on your next outdoor adventure here.

The Bubbles are iconic mountains within Acadia National Park. They can be reached from the Jordan Pond Trail, but this route requires a significant amount of scrambling during a steep ascent. The easier path to the summit is to start at the Bubble Rock Trailhead, off the park loop road. The trailhead lot, located just north of Jordan Pond, is small and will often fill up mid-day. Additionally, the lot is closed to private vehicles anytime the park bus system is running, typically late June through early September. During this period, the free bus system must be used to reach the trailhead. There are no facilities at the trailhead.

The famous Bubble Rock and peak of South Bubble can be reached with a moderate 1.7-mile round-trip hike. Bubble Rock is arguably the most most famous piece of granite in Maine. Perched precariously on a cliff's edge, it seems inevitable to fall at any minute. However, rumor holds that an entire football team once tried, and failed, to roll it off the cliff. It is truly a marvel of geology.

The top of South Bubble Rock also provides excellent views of Sargent Ridge and glimpses of Eagle Lake. Most hikers return to the trailhead from here. However, hikers who take the time to add a visit to the peak of North Bubble are treated to one of the best vistas in the park, especially for sunset. After reaching the summit of North Bubble at 872 feet, continue following the trail to the north. It will descend slightly to a ridge overlooking Eagle Lake and Bar Harbor. The additional visit to North Bubble brings the total round-trip mileage to 3 miles but is well worth the effort. Both the North and South Bubble trails have very rocky steep sections requiring good balance and some agility to navigate slippery granite boulders. Both trails are well marked using trail intersection signs and blue blazes. Dogs are allowed on both trails, but keep in mind they are only navigable by quite athletic dogs.

Logistics + Planning

Preferable season(s)

Fall
Summer
Spring

Congestion

Moderate

Parking Pass

National Park Pass

Open Year-round

Yes

Pros

Big vistas. Shaded trails. Interesting geology.

Cons

Rough terrain. Some crowds.

Trailhead Elevation

425.00 ft (129.54 m)

Highest point

872.00 ft (265.79 m)

Features

Near lake or river
Wildlife
Geologically significant
Big vistas
Wildflowers
Bird watching
Old-growth forest

Typically multi-day

No

Permit required

No

Location

Field Guide

Nearby Lodging + Camping

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