Pets allowed
Allowed with Restrictions
Guided tours
No
Backcountry camping
No
Lodging
No
Please respect the outdoors by practicing Leave No Trace. Learn more about how to apply the principles of Leave No Trace on your next outdoor adventure here.

Point Lookout State Park is located at the southernmost tip of Maryland’s western shore on a peninsula formed by the confluence of the Chesapeake Bay and the Potomac River. The park covers 1,079 acres and includes the preserved site of a Civil War prison camp, the Point Lookout Lighthouse, a large campground, public beaches, boat launch facilities, and fishing and crabbing piers.

During the Civil War, Union soldiers sent confederate prisoners to Point Lookout for incarceration. More than 50,000 prisoners were held here between 1863 and 1865. While much of the Civil War history has been erased, visitors can visit the Civil War Museum and Nature Center, the earth works of Fort Lincoln, which was a Civil War fortification, and the barracks and officer quarters of the fort. Point Lookout State Park sponsors several historic programs throughout the year, including Blue and Gray Days, a Confederate Memorial Service, and living history portrayals.

The original lighthouse, erected in 1830, still stands at the tip of the point. It is no longer active, and it is only open a few days throughout the year.

The park features sandy beaches for swimming as well as a special dog-friendly beach. The swimming area has picnic tables with grills, restrooms with showers, and a playground. Lifeguards are on duty during weekends and holidays from Memorial Day to Labor Day.

There is a boat launch facility with a fish cleaning station, canoe rentals, a fishing pier, and floating piers for crabbing. A park store is available for provisions like snacks, bait, souvenirs, and camping supplies. Three marked water trails meander around the shore of Lake Coney, the Potomac River, and the Chesapeake Bay.

A small nature trail leads through the marsh past the campground, and a nature center features interpretive programs in season. A picnic area, playground, and pavilions are available to park visitors, and a large campground features 143 sites in a wooded or waterfront setting. Six camping cabins are also available to rent.

Logistics + Planning

Preferable season(s)

Summer
Spring
Fall
Winter

Congestion

High

Parking Pass

Park entrance fee

Open Year-round

Yes

Pros

Great for swimming, boating, and fishing.

Cons

Limited hiking trails. Lots of poison ivy.

Features

ADA accessible
General store
Boat ramp(s)
Historically significant
Crabbing
Family friendly
Flushing toilets
Shelters
Fishing
Picnic tables
Bird watching
Native artifacts
Potable water
Covered picnic areas
Lighthouse

Location

Field Guide

Nearby Lodging + Camping

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