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Pets allowed
Yes-restrictions
Elevation Gain
?
Trail type
Loop
Distance
2.60 mi (4.18 km)
Please respect the outdoors by practicing Leave No Trace. Learn more about how to apply the principles of Leave No Trace on your next outdoor adventure here.

Tucked back along the edge of the High Peaks Wilderness is a popular 2,876-foot mountain called Mount Jo that peers out into the Adirondack High Peaks. The mountain was named by Adirondack pioneer Henry Van Hoevenberg after his fiancée Josephine Schofield in 1877.

There are two trails leading to the peak of Mount Jo on the 710-foot ascent: the Long Trail is easy, measuring 1.3 miles, while the Short Trail is steeper and more difficult, measuring 1.1 miles. The trail splits shortly after the trailhead and rejoins at the top to create a loop should hikers want to experience both trails.

Along the way, hikers will encounter a variety of species of trees and birds and, upon arriving at the summit, a summit host to answer questions about the area.

Some of the dominant trees you will find in the Adirondacks are fir, hemlock, maple, and spruce. The unmistakable song of the hermit thrush can be heard emanating from the forest. Hikers will also note some of the geology on the Adirondacks in the rock on the summit. The Adirondack mountains are mainly composed of anorthosite. You may notice vein-like protrusions in the rock. These hardened magma-filled cracks are known as “dikes,” and they weather much slower than the anorthosite, causing them to stick out.

Once at the summit, hikers will enjoy views of the High Peaks including the MacIntyre Range, the Great Range, Mount Marcy, and Mount Colden. To the right, Indian Pass can be seen with the distinct, flat-sided profile of Wallface Mountain noting the area.

In the foreground lies Heart Lake, the centerpiece to the property, which is owned by the Adirondack Mountain Club. Visitors can swim and paddle on Heart Lake and camp in the nearby campgrounds. Adirondack Loj is also available to accommodate guests.

Logistics + Planning

Preferable season(s)

Winter
Spring
Summer
Fall

Congestion

High

Parking Pass

General Day Use Fee

Pros

Great views.

Cons

Parking may be crowded on weekends.

Trailhead Elevation

2,110.00 ft (643.13 m)

Net Elevation Gain

710.00 ft (216.41 m)

Features

Bird watching
Wildlife
Big vistas
Wildflowers

Typically multi-day

No

Location

Field Guide

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