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Days
<1
Motors Allowed?
Yes
Difficulty
Easy / Class A
Distance
5.00 mi (8.05 km)
Please respect the outdoors by practicing Leave No Trace. Learn more about how to apply the principles of Leave No Trace on your next outdoor adventure here.

The Tualatin River is a fun and mellow river for kayaking, canoeing and stand-up paddleboarding, and you may even see a few tubes floating around on hot days. The current is slow enough that you can drop in, paddle, and return to the same point without any challenges. As a result, a few rental companies offer single-point river access rentals. Though the Tualatin River runs through populated areas, much of the river feels like a float through the countryside with the exception of a few homes, train bridges and overpasses. You are very likely to see a range of wildlife including geese, ducks, herons, and possibly river otters.

While there is no camping along the Tualatin River, you can pull into Tualatin Community Park at river mile 8.9 or Cook Park at river mile 9.8 for a quick barbecue spot or restroom break if you are looking to make a pit stop.

There are up to 38 miles of river maintained by the Tualatin Riverkeepers, and guided group and private tours are available. If you are exploring on your own, popular rental companies operating on a first-come, first-served basis include Alder Creek Kayak & Canoe Rentals and the Riverkeepers rentals at the boat ramp in Cook Park. Rentals are seasonal, and hours vary, so verify availability in advance. 

Logistics + Planning

Preferable season(s)

Spring
Summer

Congestion

Low

Parking Pass

Not Required

Pros

Mellow current. Scenic. Family friendly. Close to Portland.

Cons

A few impassable areas.

Features

Fishing
Picnic tables
Covered picnic areas
Bird watching
Wildlife

Site characteristics: Water

River

Portage required

No

Location

Field Guide

Nearby Lodging + Camping

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