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Pets allowed
Allowed with Restrictions
Guided tours
No
Backcountry camping
Yes
Lodging
No
Please respect the outdoors by practicing Leave No Trace. Learn more about how to apply the principles of Leave No Trace on your next outdoor adventure here.

At 10,518 acres, the Mount Timpanogos Wilderness is the smallest of the four that were established in the central Wasatch Mountains between 1978 and 1984. The unique and dynamic peaks, cirques, bowls, and ridges of Timp, as its called by locals, makes for one of the most challenging and popular peaks to scale in Utah. With multiple waterfalls coming off its slopes and the charming town of Sundance below, this entire area is full of rugged beauty with its unique and heavily contrasted layers of light and dark sediment. The local herds of mountain goats are a frequent sight here along with the occasional elk. Mount Timp has two trails, Aspen Grove or the Timpooneke Trailheads, which approach from opposite ends. Both lead to Emerald Lake and its wildflower-laden meadow below the final ascent.

Stewart Falls and Scout Falls are two of the finest waterfalls in northern Utah and sit on the eastern and northern ends of Timp, respectively. They can be accessed by the Alpine Loop, which is possibly the greatest autumn drive in the state. Heavy aspen groves and a ton of maple and oak cover the mountainside in a sherbet coating. The rugged terrain has pockets of glacial cirques and moraines that cover the limestone rock. Backcountry camping is commonplace especially for photographers looking for sunrise views who are trying to get a jump on the game. Witness the Primrose area from a beautiful overlook trail that starts off the Alpine Loop.

When the snow starts to pile up, the backcountry skiers and snowshoers converge on the area to recreate on the steep terrain this region provides. The Alpine Loop shuts down, but access to Sundance stays open year round for its winter resort. Just like the other three nearby wilderness areas, this is a year-round destination that has great aspects of what we all love about each season. There are less trails than the others, but the ones it does have are quite spectacular. Be sure to consult the regulations before doing any Leave No Trace backpacking in the Mount Timpanogos Wilderness.

Logistics + Planning

Preferable season(s)

Summer
Fall

Congestion

Moderate

Parking Pass

National or state forest pass

Open Year-round

Yes

Pros

Unique mountain landscape. Good wildlife including mountain goats. Great wildflowers. Close to town.

Cons

Can get crowded. Have to pay a fee to access many parts.

Features

Fishing
Big Game Watching
Big vistas
Geologically significant
Shelters
Near lake or river
Cave
Wildflowers
Bird watching
Wildlife
Waterfalls
Backcountry camping

Location

Field Guide

Nearby Adventures

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