You are here

Pets allowed
No
Guided tours
No
Backcountry camping
No
Lodging
No
Please respect the outdoors by practicing Leave No Trace. Learn more about how to apply the principles of Leave No Trace on your next outdoor adventure here.

A joint ownership between Washington State Parks and the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community allows this gorgeous parcel of land to be open to the public. The preserve and the tidal areas surrounding it are an important home for many sensitive species of marine, mammal, and bird life. Historically, the area was used to gather shellfish and seining salmon. The name Kukutali means "place of the cattail mat," in reference to the temporary shelters that would be created at the site of summer clam digs.

Flagstaff Point, (technically an island) at the end of the peninsula, is a wildlife sanctuary and has no access. If this preserve is approached with the proper care, it can remain a beautiful spot with unique opportunities for wildlife viewing.

To help protect the endangered species, it's important to stay on the designated trails. Beach use is allowed, but harvesting (such as of clams) is reserved for members of the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community.

Logistics + Planning

Preferable season(s)

Spring
Summer
Fall

Congestion

Moderate

Parking Pass

Washington Discovery Pass

Pros

Secluded and beautiful old-growth forest.

Cons

Exposed gravel road approach trail.

Address

Snee Oosh Rd
15458
La Conner, WA 98257
United States

Features

Old-growth forest
Bird watching
Wildlife

Location

Field Guide

Nearby Adventures

Comments

Have updates, photos, alerts, or just want to leave a comment?
Sign In and share them.