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Pets allowed
Not Allowed
Elevation Gain
?
Trail type
Loop
Distance
16.00 mi (25.75 km)
Please respect the outdoors by practicing Leave No Trace. Learn more about how to apply the principles of Leave No Trace on your next outdoor adventure here.

Originally designated in 1897, the combined Olympic National Forest + Park are a massive wilderness sanctuary just a few hours from Seattle by car. Once a home for several Native American tribes, Olympic National Park became a World Heritage Site in 1981.

This two day, 16-mile backpacking trip can be accomplished as a loop. If the snow level is low enough, the access road may be open all the way to Obstruction Point; however, it is more likely that snow will keep the road closed, and you may need to begin your trek about half way between the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center and Obstruction Point.

You will be treated to unobstructed views of the mountain range along the fire road. Once you reach Obstruction Point, you can enter the loop portion of the hike by proceeding along the ridge or by moving across the bowl that drops off of Obstruction Point. The route for this adventure proceeds along the ridge and returns through the bowl. Before leaving Obstruction Point along the ridge, walk toward the bowl to assess the snow level on the trail for your return. If there is too much snow, you will have a very difficult time climbing out, and you will need to return on the ridge. As you hike along the ridge you will get some incredible views of the Olympics on either side.

After descending to Moose Lake, pass up the first few campsites you see for better sites a little farther down the trail. The campsites are large, and some are right on the lakeshore. Be warned, however, that you can expect dense swarms of mosquitoes in the summer. Additionally, the deer at Moose Lake enjoy eating your clothes, so keep them in the tent with you.

Get an early start the next day, because the route back to Obstruction Point on this loop is a few miles longer than the trip in. Eventually you will hit the bowl, which is a steep section with precarious footing. Once you reach Obstruction Point, retrace your steps back down the fire road to the trailhead.

Logistics + Planning

Preferable season(s)

Summer
Fall

Congestion

Low

Parking Pass

National Park Pass

Pros

Amazing views. Challenging terrain. Wildflowers. Secluded campsites.

Cons

Mosquitoes. Hungry deer. Trailhead access can be difficult depending on snowpack.

Trailhead Elevation

5,200.00 ft (1,584.96 m)

Net Elevation Gain

2,457.00 ft (748.89 m)

Features

Backcountry camping
Big vistas
Wildflowers

Location

Field Guide + Map

Comments

This looks absolutely amazing! I need to visit Washington. wow.
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