Elevation Gain
269.00 ft (81.99 m)
Trail type
Loop
Distance
3.00 mi (4.83 km)
Warming hut
No
Please respect the outdoors by practicing Leave No Trace. Learn more about how to apply the principles of Leave No Trace on your next outdoor adventure here.

Seven Lakes State Park is an easily accesible Michigan state park located between Detroit and Flint. Sandwiched between Big and Little Seven lakes, there exists a string of well-marked trails that offer a beginner's snowshoe.

By parking at the scenic overlook about 1.2 miles from the entrance, a short land bridge allows the hiker to enter the forested region of the park. Within this area the hiker is met with rolling hills and a series of trails that crest along the lakes and dip through several bogs and wetland brush in between. The park is a popular destination for ice fishing, as well, where by several shanties can be seen throughout the park.

The path starts from the overlook (marker #4) heading south across the land bridge, where the first intersection follows shortly after entering the woods at marker #5. Turn left and follow the trail to marker #16 remaining on the Green Trail. At this marker, turn left again to follow the trail farther along until a road crossing is necessary (the park does not apply salt to the road, so there should be ample snow coverage to cross in snow shoes). The Dickinson Shelter follows shortly after the road crossing. 

Continue past the shelter on to marker #14, where the path will curve toward Dickinson Lake to the south (left). Several ice fisherman are likely to be spotted here, and there is a parking lot midway along the north end of the lake. Continue west along the trail past marker #8 and then on to marker #7.

At marker #7, there is the option to turn right and head back north to the the land bridge; however, this being a snowshoe adventure, continue straight past marker #7, where the trail will end on a point sticking out into Big Seven Lake.

From this point, the adventure continues onto the frozen lake. Be very mindful of ice thickness and always use caution. Once on the ice, turn north and trek across the frozen plateau with a slight angle east, where the trail will resume on land near marker #5. From marker #5, turn left to continue on the trail toward the land bridge and the end of this adventure's loop. Arrivng back at the overlook, take a minute to turn back and enjoy the frozen landscape and beauty found in Michigan.

Logistics + Planning

Preferable season(s)

Winter
Spring
Summer
Fall

Congestion

Moderate

Parking Pass

Park entrance fee

Pros

Easy access. Marked trailheads. Family and dog friendly.

Cons

Trail markers can be confusing.

Pets allowed

Allowed with Restrictions

Trailhead Elevation

915.00 ft (278.89 m)

Highest point

944.00 ft (287.73 m)

Features

Family friendly
Vault toilet
Near lake or river
Picnic tables
Flushing toilets
Covered picnic areas
Fishing

Typically multi-day

No

Groomed trail

No

Snowmobiles allowed

No

Location

Field Guide

Comments

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