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Pets allowed
Allowed
Elevation Gain
?
Trail type
There-and-back
Distance
11.25 mi (18.11 km)
Please respect the outdoors by practicing Leave No Trace. Learn more about how to apply the principles of Leave No Trace on your next outdoor adventure here.

A common misconception people have is that the Whitewater Trail’s (#3429) sole purpose is for access to Jefferson Park. While that is, of course, the most popular final destination, this trail has ample beauty to justify being worth the trip on its own.    

Your journey starts off with the signing of your free wilderness permit at the trailhead. This is an important detail to aid potential rescuers in the event of an emergency. Follow the rules, sign one of these, be as detailed about your trip plans as possible.   

The trail begins to gain elevation quickly from the parking area, and much of your 1,800 feet of climbing is completed in the first three miles of trail. This will feel like a blessing to some and a curse to others. Several switchbacks keep the grade manageable as you climb through old-growth forest. At 1.5 miles from the trailhead, turn right at the junction with Triangulation Trail (#3373), which leads to Triangulation Peak.

Around 2 miles from the trailhead you will emerge on the ridge and be delighted with your first views of Mount Jefferson. As you continue to climb, the forest gives way to a more rocky terrain.  Exposure can be severe in places, so mind your step and your pets  (this trail is a favorite of hikers with dogs).

At four miles from the trailhead you will reach an unaided crossing of Whitewater Creek. Summer and fall water levels are typically low enough to allow you to scramble across boulders without issue. Depending on the time of year the water may appear to be milky from the glacier melt taking place.

The trail joins the Pacific Crest Trail just 0.3 miles later, and from there an easy final mile puts you in the middle of Jefferson Park. Keep left at the PCT, which crosses one or two small creeks and a couple of small meadows. Soon you'll break out of the forest and the trail will level as you enter Jefferson Park.

Backcountry camping within 250 feet of Jefferson Park’s lakes is only permitted at signed, designated campsites. Thirty sites around five lakes are available, and reservations are required between Memorial Day and October 1; these can be made at recreation.gov starting May 1. You may camp in a pre-existing campsite outside of the 250-foot designated area if all campsites are reserved. These sites are almost all located to the east of the PCT as it runs through Jefferson Park and the standard fee is still required.

Logistics + Planning

Preferable season(s)

Summer
Fall

Congestion

Moderate

Parking Pass

NW Forest Pass

Pros

Great views. Easy access. Wildflowers. Multiple lakes.

Cons

Can be crowded. Reservations required to camp. Limited parking.

Trailhead Elevation

4,100.00 ft (1,249.68 m)

Net Elevation Gain

1,880.00 ft (573.02 m)

Features

Backcountry camping
Mountaineering
Rock climbing
Waterfalls
Big Game Watching
Wildlife
Big vistas
Old-growth forest
Wildflowers
Fishing

Suitable for

Horseback

Location

Field Guide

Nearby Adventures

Mt. Jefferson + Metolius River Area, Oregon
Mt. Jefferson + Metolius River Area, Oregon

Nearby Lodging + Camping

Oregon, Mt. Jefferson + Metolius River Area
Oregon, Mt. Jefferson + Metolius River Area

Comments

10/04/2014
This area would significantly benefit from substantial rehabilitation. Please adhere to the strict guidelines and adhere to designated trails.
07/11/2017
Hiking to Jefferson Park via the Whitewater Trail is such a treat. Little did I know that on my trip up this year there was a fire smoldering so close to the trail. I'm very grateful that I was able to hike this trail before wildfire damaged this trail and maybe the park itself. Jefferson Park is such a amazingly beautiful and special place. It really feels like a playground for outdoor enthusiasts. We ended up camping along Bays Lake at one of the few designated sites that wasn't covered in snow or water. Snow and snow melt did obstruct some of the paths around Scout Lake. The PCT trail to Russell was covered by a snow field and Russell lake itself was mostly snow and ice.
08/12/2016
Backpacked to Scout Lake for the Perseids Meteor shower and had an awesome adventure!
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